Elections: Health matters

Get informed. Get involved. Go vote.

When you vote, you register your opinion on how you think the government should operate. It’s your right. Voters consistently rate health care as a top concern and the public health system is a powerful resource to help increase health opportunities for everyone in the community.

Voters: What to consider

Governments play an important role in shaping policies that impact all aspects of our lives, including our health. Public Health Sudbury & Districts aims to highlight several key public health issues for candidates and voters to consider during an election cycle. We are counting on you to make health matter in your election journey and beyond.

Decide how you will vote by:

Browse this section to learn about how you can get informed, get involved, and go vote.

Mental health

Get informed.

There is no health without mental health.

Key recommendations:

  1.  Promote infant, child, and youth mental health through public health programming including school health, healthy families, and healthy communities while increasing access to services and decreasing wait times.
  2. Support strategies that target the social determinants of mental health across the lifespan of individuals, with a focus on reducing stigma and increasing inclusion and support.
  3. Download Public Health Sudbury & Districts’ election primer for candidates. (PDF, 1 MB)

Food insecurity

Get informed.

The solution to food insecurity is income security.

Key recommendations:

  1. Implement policy interventions that reduce income inequalities, such as a basic income guarantee, a living wage, and social assistance rates that are geared to the cost of living so that everyone has the money they need for basic needs, including food.
  2. Download Public Health Sudbury & Districts’ election primer for candidates. (PDF, 1 MB)

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Paid sick-days

Get informed.

In Canada, 58% of workers do not have access to paid sick-days.

Key recommendations:

  1. Implement a paid sick-day policy that is permanent, universally accessible to all workers, is paid at 100% of a worker’s wage, and provides at least seven paid sick-days.
  2. Download Public Health Sudbury & Districts’ election primer for candidates. (PDF, 1 MB)

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Housing

Safe, affordable, quality housing is important for health.

Key recommendations:

  1. Develop a strategy to ensure affordable, accessible, and supportive housing, including an Indigenous-led housing strategy and housing supports for older adults and for all living in Sudbury and districts.
  2. Download Public Health Sudbury & Districts’ election primer for candidates. (PDF, 1 MB)

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Indigenous health and well-being

Get informed.

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Key recommendations:

  1. Ensure sustainable funding, the transfer of necessary resources as well as authority for self-determination and control of public health programming and services across the province to First Nations and urban and rural Indigenous communities and organizations (adapted from Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario recommendation).
  2. Download Public Health Sudbury & Districts’ election primer for candidates. (PDF, 1 MB)

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Anti-racism

Get informed.

The trauma of discrimination and racism felt by racialized populations has been made worse by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Key recommendations:

  1.  Ensure sustainable funding and commitment to advance a provincial anti-racism strategic plan and ensure anti-racism initiatives are informed and led by racialized populations.
  2. Encourage the creation of inclusive community spaces for all in Northern Ontario.
  3. Ensure that hate crimes are clearly defined and result in appropriate consequences.
  4. Download Public Health Sudbury & Districts’ election primer for candidates. (PDF, 1 MB)

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Opioids

Get informed.

The highest rates of opioid-related deaths in 2020 were all in Northern Ontario.

Key recommendations:

  1. Support proactive, comprehensive, and multi-stakeholder plans that address substance use, engaging people where they use, and providing necessary education, harm reduction supports, and treatment.
  2. Download Public Health Sudbury & Districts’ election primer for candidates. (PDF, 1 MB)

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Infection prevention and control (IPAC)

Get involved.

https://www.phsd.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/SM_Messaging_2022_IPAC_1.jpg

Key recommendations:

  1. Support Ontario’s IPAC Hub model as a sustained initiative to ensure that highest risk settings are adequately supported in enhancing resident health and preventing tragic outcomes.
  2. Download Public Health Sudbury & Districts’ election primer for candidates. (PDF, 1 MB)

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Climate change

Get informed.

https://www.phsd.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/SM_Messaging_2022_Climate_change_1.jpg

Key recommendations:

  1. Invest in public transit and active transportation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, thereby creating healthy and green communities that increase physical activity.
  2. Download Public Health Sudbury & Districts’ election primer for candidates. (PDF, 1 MB)

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Public health

Get involved.

https://www.phsd.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/SM_Messaging_2022_Public_Health_1.jpg

Key recommendation:

  1. Ensure adequate funding and investments to support recovery efforts to reduce the backlog in Public Health programs and services to meet community needs, including immunization catch-up programs that promote the health of individuals and communities and reduce the burden on the health care system.
  2. Download Public Health Sudbury & Districts’ election primer for candidates. (PDF, 1 MB)

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Federal, provincial, and municipal elections

For information on upcoming and past elections, candidates, political parties, electoral districts, and voter registration visit the following websites:

The Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing also has municipal election resources for voters as well as for candidates.

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References
  1. Canadian Mental Health Association Ontario and Pollara Strategic Insights. (Wave 3, March 2021). CMHA Mental Health during COVID-19 Ontario Survey.
  2. Tarasuk V, Mitchell A. (2020). Household food insecurity in Canada, 2017-18. Toronto: Research to identify policy options to reduce food insecurity (PROOF). Accessed April 25, 2022: https://proof.utoronto.ca/resources/proof-annual-reports/household-food-insecurity-in-canada-2017-2018/
  3. PROOF Food Insecurity Policy Research. (2022). What does record inflation mean for household food insecurity in Canada? March 16, 2022. Accessed April 28, 2022: https://proof.utoronto.ca/what-does-record-inflation-mean-for-household-food-insecurity-in-canada/#:~:text=What%20is%20the%20potential%20impact,are%20forced%20to%20make%20compromises.
  4. Tarasuk V, Mitchell A. (2020). Household food insecurity in Canada, 2017-18. Toronto: Research to identify policy options to reduce food insecurity (PROOF). Accessed April 25, 2022: https://proof.utoronto.ca/resources/proof-annual-reports/household-food-insecurity-in-canada-2017-2018/
  5. Ontario Dietitians in Public Health. (2020). Position Statement and Recommendations on Responses to Food Insecurity. Accessed April 25, 2022: https://www.odph.ca/upload/membership/document/2021-04/ps-eng-corrected-07april21_3.pdf
  6. Decent Work & Health Network. (2022). Prescription for a healthy pandemic recovery: Decent work for all. Accessed April 25, 2022: 2022.04 DWHN Report.pdf – Google Drive
  7. Decent Work & Health Network. (2022). Prescription for a healthy pandemic recovery: Decent work for all. Accessed April 25, 2022: 2022.04 DWHN Report.pdf – Google Drive
  8. Decent Work & Health Network. (2022). Prescription for a healthy pandemic recovery: Decent work for all. Accessed April 25, 2022: 2022.04 DWHN Report.pdf – Google Drive
  9. Centre for Addictions and Mental Health. (2022). Housing and Mental Health Policy Framework. https://www.camh.ca/-/media/files/pdfs—public-policy-submissions/housing-policy-framework-pdf.pdf
  10. Public Health Sudbury & Districts. (2019). Circles Sudbury Story Map. https://www.phsd.ca/health-topics-programs/health-equity/a-community-approach-to-poverty-reduction
  11. Statistics Canada. (2020). One in ten Canadian households living in core housing need in 2018. https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/201002/dq201002a-eng.htm
  12. Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation. (2022). Rental Market Report. https://assets.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/sites/cmhc/professional/housing-markets-data-and-research/market-reports/rental-market-report/rental-market-report-2021-en.pdf?rev=a5a0eaac-6f70-4058-8aa3-e6d307685910
  13. City of Greater Sudbury. (2022). 2021 Point In Time Homelessness Enumeration Results Report. https://www.greatersudbury.ca/live/homelessness-initiatives/reports-and-research1/2021-homelessness-enumeration-report/
  14. Government of Canada. (2022). Provincial and Territorial Energy Profiles – Ontario. https://www.cer-rec.gc.ca/en/data-analysis/energy-markets/provincial-territorial-energy-profiles/provincial-territorial-energy-profiles-ontario.html#:~:text=GHG%20Emissions,-Ontario’s%20GHG%20emissions&text=The%20largest%20emitting%20sectors%20in,9.3%20MT%20CO2e
  15. Canadian Health Association for Sustainability and Equity. (2021). Public Transit – Good for health, social equity and the planet! https://chasecanada.org/2021/11/11/public-transit-good-for-health-social-equity-and-the-planet/
  16. Canadian Health Association for Sustainability and Equity. (2021). Active Travel – Good for health, social equity and the planet! https://chasecanada.org/2021/11/09/active-travel-good-for-health-social-equity-and-the-planet/

This item was last modified on May 12, 2022