Artificial tanning

Healthy bodies come in a variety of weights, shapes, sizes and colours. Feel good about yourself and your natural skin colour! No tan is worth dying for.

Tanning beds and the law

As of May 1, 2014, youth under 18 years of age are no longer allowed to use tanning beds in Ontario. Learn more about the Skin Cancer Prevention Act (tanning beds), 2013 (Ministry of Health).

Public Health Sudbury & Districts inspects tanning salons to ensure compliance with the Act.

If you are an owner or operator of a facility that provides access to tanning equipment, please visit our professionals section to see how this regulation affects you.

There is no safe way to tan

A base tan through artificial tanning does not protect the skin from burning.

Everyone is at risk for damage from UV radiation.

Artificial tanning

It is important that people know the risks that come with tanning. Should you chose to use tanning beds, consult with the tanning bed operator to discuss Health Canada’s Guidelines for Tanning Salon Owners, Operators, and Users as well as the things that you can do to reduce your risk, such as:

Safer choices

Sunless tanning products (creams, spays, etc.) are a safer alternative for getting a tanned look.5 Keep in mind that unless these products contain sunscreen, they do not offer any protection against the sun and its UV rays. Be sure to practice sun safety when using these products.

References:

1 Young A. Tanning devices: fast track to skin cancer. Pigm Cell Res 2004;17:2–9. Cited in Canadian Cancer Society’s Advisory Committee on Cancer Statistics (2014). Canadian Cancer Statistics 2014. Chapter 7: Special topic: Skin cancers. Toronto, ON: Canadian Cancer Society; 2014. Retrieved from https://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/canadian-cancer-statistics/?region=on on August 26, 2020.
2National steering committee for consensus on content for sun safety messages. The recommended core content for sun safety messages in Canada (May 2018). Report on the 2014/15 national consensus process – expanded report. Integration of documents previously reviewed by the national steering committee for consensus on content for sun safety messages. Updated May 2018.
3Ghissassi, F., Baan,R., Straif, K., et al., on behalf of the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer Monograph Working Group. A review of human carcinogens—Part D: radiation. The Lancet Oncology – 1 August 2009 (Vol. 10, Issue 8, Pages 751-752) DOI: 10.1016/S1470-2045(09)70213-X.
4 Canadian Cancer Society’s Advisory Committee on Cancer Statistics (2014). Canadian Cancer Statistics 2014. Chapter 7: Special topic: Skin cancers. Toronto, ON: Canadian Cancer Society; 2014. Retrieved from https://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/canadian-cancer-statistics/?region=on on August 26, 2020.
5 Canadian Dermatology Association, (2020). Position Statement-The Use of Self-Tanning Products. Retrieved from https://dermatology.ca/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/The-Use-of-Self-tanning-Products-Position-Statement-EN.pdf on July 24, 2020.


This item was last modified on August 27, 2020